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25 Easy Meal Prep Recipes You’ll Make All The Time






Source: The Girl on Bloor

It happens every few weeks without fail. I look up from my laptop as the clock strikes 5:30 p.m. and all of a sudden realize that 1. I have to make something for dinner and 2. I have absolutely no clue what that dinner is going to be. I know I’m not alone in this all-too-regular dilemma, but I can’t help but feel like it says something about my adulting abilities (or, occasionally, lack thereof). Those who meal prep: 1, Lauren: 0.

Even just a loose meal plan and a little forethought can prevent those hanger pains that tend to creep in as I search my refrigerator and kitchen cabinets, hoping that I won’t have to resort to my trusty takeout go-to. Sure, you have to invest a little bit of time up front, but it will all be worth it when you don’t fall victim to those vicious delivery fees.

We’re looking for something quick, we’re looking for something easy, we’re looking for something with maximum flavor—without maximum time spent at the stove. If that’s what you want (or—let’s be honest—need) too, look no further than these 25 easy meal prep recipes. Delicious without being super time-consuming? Check and check.

 

1. Vegan Burritos





Source: Jessica in the Kitchen

 

2. Baked Chicken Caesar Burgers





Source: Lexi’s Clean Kitchen

 

3. Curried Chickpea Cauliflower Bake





Source: Cotter Crunch

 

4. Spicy Italian Sausage and Tortellini Soup





Source: Meal Prep on Fleek

 

5. Black Bean Stuffed Sweet Potatoes





Source: The Girl on Bloor

 

6. Dairy-Free Broccoli Cheese Soup





Source: Orchids + Sweet Tea

 

7. Shawarma Spiced Stuffed Peppers with Tahini Sauce





Source: Abra’s Kitchen

 

8. Smashed White Bean and Spinach Quesadillas





Source: Sweet Peas and Saffron

 

9. Air Fryer Tofu with Honey Garlic Sauce





Source: Hello Spoonful

 

10. Spaghetti Squash Lasagna





Source: By Erin Clarke of Well Plated

 

11. Sweet Potato Black-Eyed Pea Curry





Source: Sweet Potato Soul

 

12. Slow Cooker Garlic Cuban-Inspired Pork





Source: Slender Kitchen

 

13. Meal Prep Thai Basil Chicken





Source: The Girl on Bloor

 

14. Vegetable Soup





Source: Abra’s Kitchen

 

15. Sheet Pan Sausage and Veggies





Source: Isabel Eats

 

16. Mozzarella Pesto Mac and Cheese





Source: Chantell and Brett Quernemoen | My Name is Yeh

 

17. Buffalo Chicken Stuffed Peppers





Source: By Erin Clarke of Well Plated

 

18. Whole30 Breakfast Casserole





Source: Hello Spoonful

 

19. Korean-Inspired Ground Beef Bowls





Source: Lexi’s Clean Kitchen

 

20. Slow Cooker Chipotle Honey Chicken Taco Salad





Source: Sweet Peas and Saffron

 

21. Kale Steak Power Salad





Source: Meal Prep on Fleek

 

22. Crispy Chickpea Salad Kit with Butter Fried Croutons





Source: My Name is Yeh

 

23. Lentil Coconut Curry





Source: Slender Kitchen

 

24. Slow Cooker Mushroom Wild Rice Soup





Source: Jessica in the Kitchen

 

25. Winter Kale Salad





Source: Sweet Potato Soul

 

Do you meal prep? Share your favorite quick and easy recipes below.

 

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Khloé Kardashian Just Convinced Us to Go Platinum Blonde for Fall

Khlo Kardashian standing on the red carpet with short hairCourtesy of Getty 

Once again, Khloé Kardashian is urging us all to try one of this fall's biggest hair color trends. In the last week of August, KoKo sported some shadow roots in an announcement for the clothing line she co-founded, Good American. Now, the reality star is donning another one of the trends colorists Allure has spoken to say has been highly requested this season: "just-from-the salon blonde."

She shared her new platinum blonde mane in an Instagram post on Thursday, September 16. Even though it's obvious that a bright light is shining on her, her hair still looks very blonde. Kardashian also revealed the glam team behind her latest hair color transformation, which included her go-to hairstylist Andrew Fitzsimons and colorist Tracey Cunningham. 

Both Cunningham and Fitzsimons shared some photos of the look via Instagram, but Cunningham also provided a breakdown of the products she used to get KoKo's hair platinum blonde. The lineup consisted of one of Redken's Flash Lift products (Cunningham is a Redken partner), some Olaplex before adding color (Cunningham is also an Olaplex partner), and Redken's Shades 010 N on the hairline's roots. 

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If you're considering going platinum blonde like KoKo this fall, always make sure to schedule a consultation with a colorist, especially if your natural color is dark like hers, to discuss everything that'll go into the upkeep of so much bleach. On the flip side, if you're already blonde, "just-from-the-salon blonde" is a relatively low-maintenance hair color option for the season. As Sydney, Australia-based colorist Kate Reid previously told Allure, folks with medium to fine hair would also fare well with this color because "[blonde] helps to create thickness in the hair." Besides, blondes do have more fun, right? Now, to the salon!

All products featured on Allure are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through our retail links, we may earn an affiliate commission.

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When Bathing Is About More Than Just Being Physically Clean

photo of a woman in a bath filled with rose petals the rose petals are moving in a gifIllustration by Clara Hendler

"I love water. I love praying into the water before I get to a bath, or even just to take a shower," says Juju Bae, a Hoodoo and Ifa practitioner who speaks about Black traditional religions on her podcast, A Little Juju. "Even if I'm not always putting all the good juju in the water, water in itself is holy. Water itself can hold your intention."

In many Black spiritual practices that predate colonial interactions, there has long been a reverence for water and cleansing. These rituals and concepts have been preserved and transported to the Americas and beyond as a byproduct of the Trans-Atlantic Slave trade. They can be found in everything from African Traditional Religions and their descendants, such as Ifa and Black American Hoodoo, to the cultural syncretism embedded in Black expressions of Abrahamic religions.

"Water has no enemy," says Juju Bae. "It cleanses us physically, it cleanses us spiritually." She emphasizes that in many African Traditional Religions, water is venerated and viewed as a life source. In the West, she notes, that reverence for nature isn't typically quite as significant. This has a distinct effect on Black people's contemporary relationship to water and its multifaceted uses. And in recent months, an aversion to water, soap, or any kind of hygienic tool or practice has been brought to the forefront of our cultural discourse.

The Hygiene Culture Wars

A phenomenon that can only be aptly described as the "hygiene culture wars" has recently taken hold of digital media. Celebrities have openly shared their bathing regimens, often without waiting for anyone to ask them about it; from Ashton Kutcher and Mila Kunis disclosing their reluctance to clean their children if they aren't visibly soiled to Jake Gyllenhaal asserting that he deems bathing to be less necessary as "we naturally clean ourselves."

photo of a woman submerged in a bath the water is peach and swirly and here are roses in the bath.Illustration by Clara Hendler

Most folks who take the "less is more" approach to bathing insist that their infrequent washing adheres to contemporary medical guidance from dermatologists. (For what it's worth, dermatologists Allure has spoken to say showering once — or even twice — a day is generally just fine for your skin.) Predictably, the reaction to these revelations was overwhelming, with folks on social media rushing to share their own perspectives on cleanliness and hygienic practices. Unsurprisingly, much of Black Twitter expressed distaste over such blasé routines.

Whether or not someone's hygiene habits are considered acceptable has more to do with power and class than the medical legitimacy of their routines. The so-called elite have a history of viewing the lower classes (in which Black people are overrepresented) as filthy and undesirable, no matter how many times they bathe per day. As physician James Hamblin, who is white and went viral for his disclosure that he had stopped showering, put it: "One of the main reasons I've been able to go so long without using [shampoo and deodorant] is because of the privilege of my position in American society. To the degree that these standards are culturally determined, I am coming from the group that has created these norms."

Digital discourse notwithstanding, containing the concept of cleansing in relation to whiteness and wealth is extremely limiting in scope and context, despite the comical levels of disgust expressed by Black people and other POC in the Twitterverse. For many Black people, especially those who follow the practices and rituals of African Traditional Religions, hygiene is both a physical and spiritual requirement.

Spiritual Cleansing Across Practices

Physically, this appreciation of water can extend to a variety of regular rituals such as spiritual baths. "People are into cleansing their homes, smoking out their homes with sage, palo santo, and incense," says Iya Osundara Ogunsina, a priestess also known as Bruja Banton on social media. "You can use a spiritual bath to also cleanse your body; I think the body gets neglected." 

Both Juju Bae and Iya Osundara stress that the creation and use of spiritual baths as a cleansing ritual is not restricted to adherents of any specific traditional religious practices. "[Spiritual baths] can actually just be [taken in] regular water that you pray over," Juju Bae says, adding that you can also infuse the water with herbs and other ingredients to amplify whatever intention you have for the bath. Similar to Iya Osundara, Juju Bae also takes spiritual baths frequently. 

photo of a woman standing under a watering can water is being poured on her se is surrounded by rosesIllustration by Clara Hendler

The ritual of placing intentions into the water as a cleansing step is also reflected in a variety of expressions of Abrahamic religion. In many traditional Baptist sects, including majority Black congregations in the American South, baptism isn't historically perceived as merely a sprinkling of water on someone's forehead, but a full submersion in a body of water such as a river to cleanse one of their sins. "I know some old-school churches that still take people out to lakes, ponds, rivers, and oceans, dunking them fully in the all-whites," Juju Bae emphasizes.

This also extends to classical African-American spirituals, which are frequently infused with significant references to water and its power. The familiar lyrics to "Wade In the Water," for example, are enmeshed with multiple subtle references to water as a cleansing and liberating space, not just biblically, but as a cue for slaves to communicate with each other as they sought an escape to freedom. Take the line, "God's gonna trouble the water." As Howard Thurman, former dean of the chapel at Howard University expresses in his book Deep River and the Negro Spiritual Speaks of Life and Death, "For [the slaves] the 'troubled waters' meant the ups and downs, the vicissitudes of life. Within the context of the 'troubled' waters of life, there are healing waters, because God is in the midst of the turmoil." The song is a heuristic that has persisted throughout the centuries as a means of survival and a search for mercy.

The Deeper Significance of Bathing Rituals

As a diviner and Olorisa (a priestess of the Orisa practice) initiated to Osun, Iya Osundara sells spiritual baths at her website, Iyalode's corner, providing her community with a variety of spiritual aids to promote cleansing, protection, prosperity, and clarity. "[Spiritual cleansing is] something that my (spiritual) Godmother has taught us to do as a way to just keep up your own hygiene practice," Osundara says. Since her initiation into Osun in 2019, she takes a spiritual bath every week.

"My relationship to water is primarily because of my ancestors' relationship to water through church through baptism, but also through the Transatlantic slave trade," Juju Bae explains. "I have ancestors who decided to jump off of ships in the water and their spirits still live there, their memories still live there, their bodies still live there." That connection is a complicated mélange of trauma and healing.

These themes are also represented in one of the defining moments of contemporary Black pop culture: Beyoncé's visual album Lemonade, released in 2016. Water is a powerful supporting character, whose presence is infused throughout the project. At the beginning of the film, Beyoncé is submerged in water and grief. A few minutes later, she triumphantly opens the door to a cathedral in a beaming yellow dress, water rushing onto the front steps in her stead, later smashing a hydrant and luxuriating in its bursting wells of hydration.

woman sitting in a bathtub she is surrounded by rosesIllustration by Clara Hendler

The contemporary conversation over cleansing is essential to parsing out the many ways in which white supremacy affects our interactions. At a more comprehensive level, however, the acknowledgment of the essentiality of water is not restricted to a performance or a rebuttal to stereotypes associated with Black and other nonwhite communities. Water, for many, expresses spiritual decontamination, salvation, self-care, and survival. It is the ultimate life force that compels consistent acknowledgment and consumption, both internally and externally. Hygiene has been intertwined with Black traditions even in the direst of circumstances, and that anchored reverence is a genetic imprint that no pop culture trend can divorce us from.

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The Best Fall Jackets of 2021, Period

The Everygirl’s product selections are curated by the editorial team. If you buy something through our links, we may earn an affiliate commission, at no cost to you. We only recommend products we genuinely love.





Source: Aïda Badji Sané

It feels like the majority of us are waiting with bated breath for those first days that really feel like fall, but perhaps you’re someone who wants to hold onto summer, white-knuckled and rejecting any mention of a PSL or cozy knit. The thing that will get you to accept fall with open arms? The once-a-year fall jackets.

Each season has its perks, but one of fall’s main ones is the styling options that come with the jackets. It’s too early for the bulky coats of winter, but it’s crisp enough that you need an added layer, and that window is one that needs to be taken advantage of.

With rich tones and cozy textures and a world of outfit options to create with them, fall 2021’s jackets are here, and they came to make a statement. One look at these and you’ll be packing your summer clothes away without so much as a batted eye.

 

Cropped Blazers

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A post shared by Samio – samio.co.uk (@samiorenelda)

Blazers are considered a constant in terms of fall wear, but this year, there’s a twist: They’re a bit shorter than usual. Blazers that hit near the waist are not only the hottest take on the classic jacket but also one of the hottest pieces of fall fashion, period.

Abercrombie & Fitch

Cropped Blazer

Shop now

Missguided

Stone Cropped Blazer

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Abercrombie & Fitch

Tweed Cropped Blazer

Shop now

ELOQUII

Tweed Bolero Jacket

Shop now

ZARA

Textured Blazer

Shop now

ZARA

Buttoned Cropped Blazer

Shop now

Faux Fur

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A post shared by Aïda Badji Sané (@basicstouch)

There’s nothing like a fur moment for fall, and this year, fur is a bit shaggier than usual. With a bit more of a disheveled texture, faux fur is making jackets interesting and giving a 2021 twist to the classic shearling teddy coat. It gives a bit of excitement to any look and is easy to pull off.

Abercrombie & Fitch

Cropped Sherpa Shirt Jacket

Shop now

BB DAKOTA BY STEVE MADDEN

Faux Fur Teddy Coat

2 colors available
Shop now

H&M

Trench Coat with Fur Lining

2 colors available
Shop now

H&M

Faux Fur Coat

Shop now

ASOS

Hooded Faux Fur Coat

Shop now

ASOS

Faux Fur Shacket

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Bomber Jackets

View this post on Instagram

A post shared by Juna – Streetwear (@junabanda_)

There’s something that feels nostalgic about bomber jackets, no? Whether it’s because of their resemblance to the classic letterman jacket or just because they always tend to circulate back into style, they feel like a piece of fall that we’re always happy to come back to. 

Abercrombie & Fitch

Faux Leather Bomber Jacket

2 colors available
Shop now

ELOQUII

Varsity Jacket

Shop now

BB DAKOTA BY STEVE MADDEN

Faux Leather Hooded Jacket

Shop now

MANGO

Checked Jacket

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ASOS

Faux Leather Bomber Jacket

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ASOS

Curve Faux Leather Bomber Jacket

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Shearling Trim

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A post shared by Chandler DeHart (@candidlychan)

In 2020, all anyone could talk about (or wear, for that matter) was the teddy coat, and for good reason. But this year, shearling is a bit more understated, with jackets having embellishments of it near the seams, collar, and cuffs instead of being the overall material. The result? A natural feeling of glam that we’re totally on board with.

BILLABONG X WRANGLER

Faux Fur Lining Jean Jacket

Shop now

BP Plus

Denim Trucker Jacket with Faux Shearling Collar

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ASOS

Panelled Blue Faux Fur Jacket

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ASOS

Black Fleece Shacket

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ASOS

Faux Suede Aviator Jacket

Shop now

ASOS

Sherpa Aviator

Shop now

Puffers

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A post shared by Yuyan (@itsyuyann)

We all probably have a puffer or two in our wardrobes, but this year, they’re a little more exciting than we’re used to. In fun patterns, saturated colors, and oversized fits, they’re the jacket you’re going to want to wrap yourself in day in and day out.

Abercrombie & Fitch

Vegan Leather Puffer Jacket

6 colors available
Shop now

Abercrombie & Fitch

Utility Puffer Jacket

2 colors available
Shop now

H&M

Cropped Puffer Jacket

2 colors available
Shop now

H&M+

Padded Vest

Shop now

ASOS

Washed Linen Puffer Jacket

Shop now

ASOS

Oversized Puffer Jacket

Shop now

The Only Boots You Need for Fall 2021
plus what to wear them with
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How a Kitchen Island Can Transform Your Apartment






Source: Danielle Moss | The Everygirl

We all know that one of the hallmarks of apartment living is having to deal with a smaller-than-average kitchen. And that’s stating it generously—if you live in New York City like I do, your kitchen may truly be minuscule, if you’re lucky enough to even have a super defined prep space at all! I took many virtual tours of apartments that featured mini-fridges or refrigerators positioned in the living room. We city gals have truly seen it all when it comes to cramped spaces.

Recently, though, I’ve noticed that many fellow apartment dwellers have gotten creative when it comes to optimizing their storage and prep space. The secret? Purchasing a freestanding kitchen island that looks chic enough to elevate even the most dated of kitchen spaces and is also ultra-functional. Below, we’re showing you five faux island setups that will make you want to purchase one of your own—because let’s face it, throwing together an entire meal or engaging in some therapeutic Sunday afternoon baking can prove pretty challenging when your only available countertop is approximately the size of a standard placemat.

 

1. Turn your island into a coffee station

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A post shared by Marianne Sides | The MA Times (@mariannesides)

Just because it’s called an island doesn’t mean that the piece you purchase has to be put in the middle of your kitchen—again, many of us don’t have the square footage or room layout for this to be a possibility. Instead, push your island up against a wall and turn it into a mini coffee bar or a place to stash bowls or fruit—you name it! By moving bulky coffee makers off of the main counter and giving them a designated home of their own, you’ll free up prep space close to the oven, which will definitely come in handy when cooking meals.

 

2. Or style it as a breakfast bar

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A post shared by Carly | MY NYC APARTMENT (@mycityapartment)

If you’re not as concerned about counter space but are a bit more ambivalent about your seating situation, opt for an island with an overhang and style your own breakfast bar. Bonus points if the piece features storage cabinets on the other side; use these to tuck away unsightly appliances and bulky pots and pans.

 

3. Use an island to corral cooking essentials

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A post shared by 𝕋ℍ𝔼 𝕄𝔸ℝ𝕂𝕊 𝔽𝔸𝕄𝕀𝕃𝕐 (@adventureintow)

Even a small kitchen cart can make a big impact. A piece like this one should be able to function in even the tiniest of cooking spaces and makes for a great place to set aside ingredients while cooking. There are always items that you need to keep nearby but can’t quite squeeze onto the countertop without risking a spill—we’ve been there.

 

4. Try this twist on the classic bar cart

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A post shared by Miranda Schroeder (@thoughtfullythrifted)

Those looking for an ultra-functional twist on the traditional bar cart might want to source an island that offers plenty of wine glass storage. This makes for an ideal setup when entertaining, too—guests can easily serve themselves, and multiple people can gather around the island at once to fill their glasses.

 

5. Fill a narrow spot with a wooden piece

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A post shared by Shelby | Pretty in the Pines (@prettyinthepines)

A thin wood console table can also serve a key purpose and is a great choice for long and narrow kitchens. Use it as a sit-down coffee bar and sip your morning cup of Joe somewhere that isn’t your stain-prone sofa!

 

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